1. In your working conditions avoid everyday mediocrity. Semi-relaxation, to a background of insipid sounds, is degrading. On the other hand, accompaniment by an etude or a cacophony of voices can become as significant for work as the perceptible silence of the night. If the latter sharpens the inner ear, the former acts as a touchstone for a diction ample enough to bury even the most wayward sounds.
    Walter Benjamin’s advice on your daily creative environment, from his 13 rules of writing. Pair with the daily routines of famous writers. (via explore-blog)

    (via explore-blog)

    1 year ago  /  207 notes  /  Source:

  2. Time ticks by; we grow older. Before we know it, too much time has passed and we’ve missed the chance to have had other people hurt us. To a younger me this sounded like luck; to an older me this sounds like a quiet tragedy.
    – Douglas Coupland (via inmemoryofcookie)

    1 year ago  /  10 notes  /  Source: inmemoryofcookie

  3. How far, we must ask ourselves, is a book influenced by its writer’s life — how far is it safe to let the man interpret the writer? How far shall we resist or give way to the sympathies and antipathies that the man himself rouses in us — so sensitive are words, so receptive of the character of the author? These are questions that press upon us when we read lives and letters, and we must answer them for ourselves, for nothing can be more fatal than to be guided by the preferences of others in a matter so personal.

    But also we can read such books with another aim, not to throw light on literature, not to become familiar with famous people, but to refresh and exercise our own creative powers.

    Virginia Woolf on the allure of reading famous diaries and letters (via explore-blog)

    (via explore-blog)

    1 year ago  /  176 notes  /  Source:

  4. explore-blog:

“Every tiny atom in your body came from a star that exploded long before you were born.”
You Are Stardust teaches kids about the whimsy and interconnectedness of the universe in stunning illustrated dioramas.
Bonus: Amidst the jarring gender gap in science education, this is a project by two women. 

    explore-blog:

    “Every tiny atom in your body came from a star that exploded long before you were born.”

    You Are Stardust teaches kids about the whimsy and interconnectedness of the universe in stunning illustrated dioramas.

    Bonus: Amidst the jarring gender gap in science education, this is a project by two women. 

    (via explore-blog)

    1 year ago  /  813 notes  /  Source:

  5. Time has a funny way of collapsing when you go back to a place you once loved. You find yourself thinking, I was kissed in that building, I climbed up that tree.
    Ann Patchett (via explore-blog)

    (via explore-blog)

    1 year ago  /  12,613 notes  /  Source:

  6. photo

    photo

    1 year ago  /  4,477 notes  /  Source: savemefromdistractions

  7. (via thisnapoleonride)

    1 year ago  /  493,383 notes  /  Source: anxietyanthologies

  8. explore-blog:

Mapping the distribution of higher education in America. Compare and contrast with the distribution of poverty:

    explore-blog:

    Mapping the distribution of higher education in America. Compare and contrast with the distribution of poverty:

    1 year ago  /  287 notes  /  Source: explore-blog

  9. newyorker:

“Skilled immigrants aren’t, as a group, taking jobs away from native-born workers. They’re creating them.”
James Surowiecki  explains why comprehensive immigration reform “will be a good thing for the economy, and it’s as close to a win-win policy as you’re going to find in politics”: http://nyr.kr/ZnmlWy

    newyorker:

    “Skilled immigrants aren’t, as a group, taking jobs away from native-born workers. They’re creating them.”

    James Surowiecki  explains why comprehensive immigration reform “will be a good thing for the economy, and it’s as close to a win-win policy as you’re going to find in politics”: http://nyr.kr/ZnmlWy

    1 year ago  /  287 notes  /  Source: newyorker.com

  10. explore-blog:

A fascinating meditation on the shortcomings of memory, necessary for the creative mind, by neurologist Oliver Sacks.

    explore-blog:

    A fascinating meditation on the shortcomings of memory, necessary for the creative mind, by neurologist Oliver Sacks.

    1 year ago  /  912 notes  /  Source: explore-blog